Luke Bonaccorsi
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Blog

Per aspera ad astra

When I was younger, I wanted to be a "robot scientist". I found them fascinating and wanted to learn about how they work and how to build them, but I lived in the middle of nowhere, in a time when the web was still finding it's feet, which meant that the resources weren't really there for me and eventually I realised that it wasn't really a viable option.

In my early teens, I found web development and I've been hooked ever since. Open source was, and still is, massively helpful for me to learn from. Whether that's taking apart open source projects to learn how they work, or contributing to them.

Recently, I found out that these two worlds collided.

Now with added Eleventy!

Ever since I gave Eleventy a go when I was building the LeedsJS website, I've been a huge fan and advocate, even convincing some people to give it a try out of my sheer enthusiasm for it. I absolutely love the simplicity and flexibility of it, as well as things like data files. I have a whole post talking about this stuff from when I was building the new LeedsJS website.

I've been meaning to convert my own site over for a while, and recently took the plunge and decided to do it. As well as giving me the opportunity to dig into Eleventy without a deadline pressing me, it also gave me the chance to make some stylistic changes.

The Viewbuilder Pattern

Many companies have internal APIs that provide their data, but scaling these can be tricky and expensive. There are also cases where you're using a rate-limited 3rd party API that you need to use to provide data to the frontend of your website.

While I was working at Sky Betting and Gaming, I was introduced to a pattern that they use called a viewbuilder. I find it to be a really interesting and useful idea, and we used it heavily in my time there.

Connecting my Christmas jumper to the Internet

Some of you will be aware that while I'm not necessarily great at it, I enjoy playing around with hardware. One of the talks that I've been fortunate enough to travel the world to give is about using JavaScript to do bits of home automation, including automating my curtains and making my own thermostat.

So it may come as no real surprise that when I heard there was going to be a Christmas jumper competition at work last year, I decided add LEDs to my jumper and connect it to the Internet.